How much does a Missouri DWI affect auto insurance rates?

When Missouri authorities charge you with drunk driving and that charge winds up leading to a conviction, you can expect to have to pay a substantial amount of money in fines and other expenses relating to your action. Even if it is your first time receiving a driving while intoxicated conviction in the state, you can plan on it costing you a substantial sum. Furthermore, some of the DWI-related expenses you face will continue to plague you even after you begin driving again.

For example, you can expect to pay substantially more for automotive insurance coverage in Missouri once you have a DWI conviction on your record, Insure.com reports, even if you are a first-time DWI offender. Just how much more will automotive insurance typically cost you once you have a Missouri DWI in your driving history?

By the numbers

If you are, in fact, a first-time DWI offender, and you had an otherwise relatively typical driving record before your conviction, you were probably paying your auto insurer somewhere around $1,288 annually for coverage. Once you have that DWI on your record, though, you can plan on your insurance premiums rising more than 60%. In fact, Missouri residents with DWIs typically see their automotive insurance rates go up 64% following their convictions, which is an $829 annual increase over what they were paying for coverage prior to their crimes.

Struggles associated with finding coverage

While paying 64% more each year for auto insurance can be a huge financial burden, you may also find that you have trouble obtaining insurance coverage from any provider once you get a conviction for drunk driving. Shopping around and securing quotes from several different providers willing to cover you may be your best bet at keeping your insurance-related expenses manageable.

A Missouri DWI conviction can impact your job, your personal relationships and your finances, among other areas of your life. In some cases, the financial repercussions associated with such a conviction can last several years, even longer.

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