How To Avoid A DWI During the Holidays

Holidays are opportunities for kicking back and having a few drinks. However, when you end up having a bit too much to drink and then get behind the wheel, you run the risk of hurting yourself and others. Authorities in Springfield often set up additional drunk-driver checkpoints during holiday times when drivers are leaving parties and more likely to exceed the Missouri state limit of having a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 percent.
It is important for you to understand how you can enjoy the holiday season and social events without getting a DWI on your record. Keeping a couple simple tips in mind can make the difference between an accident or arrest and getting home safely.
Being aware of checkpoints and saturation patrols
Law enforcement authorities often use drunk driving checkpoints to raise public awareness about drunk driving and to try to deter people who have had too much to drink from getting on the road. In 2017, however, the Missouri government proposed reduced funding for these checkpoints as part of a larger budget bill. This brought up the question of whether checkpoints are less effective than so-called saturation patrols.
Saturation patrols are when four or more officers work in a concentrated effort in one area to deter drunk driving. Its supporters say that checkpoints are ineffective because word quickly spreads once one is set up, thus defeating the purpose. Knowing that saturation patrols may be more widely used can help you understand the increased risks of getting a DWI.
Staying within the legal limit
In Missouri, the legal limit for BAC is 0.08 percent. In practical terms, however, it may be confusing to understand how many drinks that actually translates to. Several factors play a role in determining your BAC, and as such, the best advice is not to get behind the wheel if you have anything to drink. If you miscalculate and take the risk of driving while over the legal limit, the authorities may place you under arrest. During a stop, police officers will make their own observations about your sobriety or lack thereof. Officers take several other factors into consideration besides the test of your blood alcohol limit. This means it may not be effective to try to gauge how many drinks will keep you below the legal limit.
It is never safe to take a risk in getting behind the wheel if you have had any alcohol to drink. The authorities know that many people do so during the holidays, however. That being the case, if the police stop you at a checkpoint and you have had too much alcohol, remain courteous and polite. If they place you under arrest, you may wish to seek professional advice from an attorney with experience handling DWI cases.

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Springfield Criminal Defense Attorney Adam Woody Analyzes the Craig Wood Trial for Local CBS Affiliate KOLR10

Throughout the death penalty case of Craig Wood, Adam Woody served as a trial analyst on the morning show, Daybreak, for the Springfield CBS Affiliate, KOLR10.  For recaps of the trial, insight into trial strategy, information on the trial process, and more, see the daily segments below.

October 30

October 31

November 1

November 2

November 3

November 6

November 7

Although the jury found Craig Wood guilty of first degree murder, they could not come to an agreement as to whether the death penalty was appropriate.  Judge Thomas Mountjoy will sentence the Defendant in January, and it will be at that time we will know whether he receives life in prison without the possibility of parole, or the death penalty.

 

The Craig Wood Murder Trial: What to Expect from the Sentencing Phase

With the fifth day of the Craig Wood Murder Trial starting up, many questions have arisen about the death penalty. According to Missouri Law, there are two possibilities of sentencing with a first degree murder conviction: death by legal injection, or life in prison without any possibility of parole. Adam joins KOLR 10 Daybreak on this Friday morning to discuss what is happening on day five of this fast paced trial. Click here to watch.

Public Defender Shortage: What Does It Mean?

The shortage of public defenders has reached an all time crisis, but even with few resources these defenders are still constitutionally obligated to represent clients in need. The state must find representation for the criminally accused even if it requires private attorneys to work for free. To see the KOLR 10 interview with Adam Woody regarding the newest Supreme Court ruling, click here.