Adam Woody Law

Robot, Do You Know Why I Stopped You?

Why Police Might Pull Over Self Driving Cars

We may not be too many years away from the point where self-driving cars become a regular presence out on the roads. Such a shift in the type of vehicles being used would likely bring many big changes along with it. Among these changes are changes when it comes to traffic tickets.

A large portion of the typical traffic tickets currently issued are tickets for types of driving conduct (like speeding). Self-driving cars, by taking human drivers out of the equation, might take a lot of these typical reasons for police issuing traffic tickets off of the table. So, the advent of self-driving cars could perhaps bring about a big drop in many typical types of traffic tickets.

However, self-driving cars are unlikely to mean the end of traffic tickets.

For one, self-driving cars, at least in the near-term, will likely have some sort of override feature. So, traditional types of traffic tickets could still be issued for alleged traffic violations committed by human drivers when they were in an override mode and in control of the normally self-driving vehicle.

Also, not all traffic tickets are for driving conduct. For example, tickets are sometimes issued for things such as vehicle equipment problems or failing to wear a seatbelt. Many of these non-driving-conduct traffic tickets would likely remain possibilities after cars turn autonomous.

Self-driving cars could perhaps even lead to their being some new types of equipment-related traffic tickets. If self-driving cars become commonplace, it seems likely that there would be various regulations and rules put in place regarding what kinds of autonomous equipment such cars are to have and the maintenance of such equipment. One wonders if violations of such rules/requirements could become ticketable offenses.

So, while self-driving cars could end up bringing about some big changes when it comes to traffic tickets, traffic tickets are unlikely to completely disappear anytime soon as things individuals could potentially end up facing.

Experienced traffic ticket attorneys can help individuals who have been issued traffic tickets, whether for driving or non-driving conduct, with understanding what options they might have regarding fighting their ticket.

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What to do If You Are Pulled Over for Suspected DWI in Missouri

What you do and don’t do after a DWI stop can affect the outcome of your case. Your actions or those of the police may enable your DWI defense attorney to obtain a dismissal of the charge or another positive outcome.

After You Are Stopped By The Police

If you have been drinking and are pulled over, keep the following in mind during your interaction with the police officer:

  • Be respectful and cooperative — Hostility or rudeness will only invite increased scrutiny by the officer. Be polite and responsive to the officer’s questions.
  • Remember that you are probably on camera — Many DWI stops in Missouri are recorded by squad car videos. This video can provide evidence that supports the officer’s decision to arrest you. Be mindful of this fact and behave appropriately.
  • You have the right to remain silent — Provide the officer with your driver’s license and insurance card. But don’t answer any questions regarding your consumption of alcohol or admit that you have been at a bar. At this point, the officer is looking for information that will allow him or her to continue the investigation to find evidence against you. The less information you provide, the more difficult the officer’s task is.
  • Field sobriety tests — In asking you to perform these tests, the officer is looking for evidence that you are impaired. Respectfully decline to perform field sobriety tests. If he or she presses you to perform these tests, restate your refusal in polite language.
  • Do not submit to a portable breath test — The results from this hand-held device can provide probable cause for the police to arrest you. Refusing to take a portable breath test does not violate Missouri’s implied consent law.
  • Get legal help as soon as possible — If you refuse to perform field sobriety tests or take a portable breath test, you may be transported to a police station and asked to take an official breath test. At that point, should you take the breath test? That is a complicated issue that depends on the specific circumstances of your case. You should obtain advice from an experienced DWI defense attorney.
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Here’s What Happens When Your Uber Driver Gets a DUI

front view of a car driving fast at night

When Katie Gallion’s Uber driver started swerving across the road’s rumble strips only 15 minutes into her ride near Durham, North Carolina, on June 3, she decided to give him a pass. At 10 p.m., it was dark outside and raining hard, she told BuzzFeed News. She didn’t know he’d polished off four beers before starting to drive for Uber that night.

When the car crossed over a grass median, coming precariously close to the oncoming traffic lane, Gallion began considering her options. “I was getting really scared and contemplating that maybe I should nicely ask him to pull over,” the 33-year-old pharmacist said.

But she waited, and after turning onto a two-lane country road, the driver veered off the road and into a ditch, where the ride continued. “I was a crying mess, thinking, Oh my god, what if he doesn’t let me out of the car?” Gallion said. “Then I yelled, ‘What is going on? Let me out!’”

Finally, the driver pulled into the parking lot of a closed minimart and let Gallion out of the car. “I’m a good driver,” Gallion said he told her in a halfhearted attempt to convince her to continue the ride. Then he offered to call her another Uber.

Gallion called a friend instead, and together they called Wake County police. “I really could have died,” Gallion said. “I don’t know what would’ve happened … if I didn’t get out of the car.”

Gallion’s Uber driver was arrested for driving while impaired at 11:09 p.m. — about an hour after her ride began. According to Wake County Superior Court records, he had a blood alcohol level of 0.15 — nearly four times the .04 legal limit for commercial drivers. The driver, who had no prior arrest record, was also charged with failure to heed a light or siren.

Reached for comment, Gallion’s Uber driver told BuzzFeed News he had accepted one other fare on the night of the incident. He said his memory of Gallion’s ride is unclear. “I remember knowing that she was uncomfortable and it was raining,” he said.


Gallion reported the incident to Uber at around 1 a.m., after reaching her friend’s house. About 12 hours later, the company responded with a boilerplate email and a refund of $69.24 for her ride. In a follow-up phone call, a company representative told Gallion it was “working diligently” to investigate the incident but could not discuss it in detail because of its privacy policy. She asked if he had been deactivated. Uber declined to tell her, citing a company mandate “to respect the privacy of all users.”

“Uber has a zero tolerance policy for the use of drugs and alcohol, and upon learning of these allegations, we immediately removed the driver’s access to the platform,” an Uber spokesperson told BuzzFeed News. Uber said this driver in particular had no prior safety complaints and was “highly rated.


BuzzFeed News reported in March that screenshots of Uber’s internal customer support platform showed the company’s instructions for how representatives should handle incidents involving alcohol and drug use. “If rider does not wish to escalate with LE (law enforcement) or media, follow strike system, issue warning, and resolve without escalating.” Under resolution suggestions, the screenshot showed that for the “1st strike,” customer service representatives were instructed to issue a “final warning,” and to permanently ban drivers at strike two.

Emails provided to BuzzFeed News show that Uber first reached out to Gallion’s driver by email at 1 p.m. the following day, about 12 hours after she reported him to the company for drunk driving. Unable to reach him over the phone (he was in jail), a company representative asked the driver when he was available discuss a “concerning report” by phone. When he checked his Uber app, he saw he had already lost access to the platform.

The next day, June 5, Uber conducted a brief interview during which Gallion’s driver was asked to review the details of the allegations against him. The driver told BuzzFeed News that he confirmed to Uber that he had indeed been arrested for driving under the influence. The following day he received an email notification from Uber saying he’d been deactivated and his “partnership” with the company ended. “They handled it quickly,” the driver said.

This isn’t the first time an Uber driver has been arrested for driving under the influence. That said, Uber notes that ride-hailing can be a wise alternative to driving after drinking. According to a study the company conducted with the nonprofit group Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Uber’s entry into a number of markets correlated with subsequent declines in DUI arrests.

Uber says it depends on riders to rate drivers and provide feedback, which its safety team reviews. “Uber may also deactivate a driver who receives several unconfirmed complaints of drug or alcohol use,” the ride-hail giant’s deactivation policy reads. The company told BuzzFeed it has a team of former law enforcement professionals on staff to help with police investigations. When BuzzFeed News asked if it has a system for learning about drivers’ law enforcement incidents instead of just relying on riders’ alerts, Uber said in some states background checks are “periodically” updated. Uber did not respond when asked if North Carolina is included among those states.

On Wednesday, Uber announced it is piloting app features aimed at making rides safer. In several markets across the U.S., drivers will receive daily reports on their braking, acceleration, and navigation. The goal, Uber told BuzzFeed, is to lay the groundwork to eventually create a system that gives the company real-time alerts about erratic drivers.

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Pot Breathalyzers are Being Tested By Law Enforcement

With the number of states that have passed recreational marijuana laws, the need to detect stoned drivers has increased. Technology companies have come to the rescue, creating devices to detect whether an individual has recently smoked or ingested marijuana. While the devices are still undergoing testing, one researcher, who happens to be a volunteer officer, has begun field testing. Like the alcohol breathalyzers that are commonplace, the marijuana breathalyzer detects the active ingredient, THC, in an individual’s breath. Based on the reading provided, an officer will be able to tell if a person has recently ingested or smoked marijuana. However, unlike alcohol, where there have been countless studies regarding the point of impairment, the research in regards to marijuana is lacking.

Why Does Law Enforcement Need a Pot Breathalyzer?

Marijuana, unlike alcohol, cannot be as accurately detected in urine, saliva, or blood tests. While it will show up in all three tests, the problem is that it can show up for days, weeks, or even months after the last consumption. The breathalyzer serves to bridge the gap in evidence an officer would need, not just to make an arrest, but also to make a court conviction more probable. The pot breathalyzer would allow officers to premise an arrest for DUI on marijuana based not only on a field sobriety test, but also on a breathalyzer reading that shows the driver has consumed marijuana within the last few hours. The device cannot detect marijuana use beyond a few hours.

When Will Device Go to Market?

While nearly half the country now allows either medical or recreational marijuana, the pot breathalyzers are not set to be publicly available for some time. The manufacturers are trying to rush the product to market, but more time is still needed. The devices still need to go through rigorous testing for accuracy, as well as the development of a standardized scale for when a person should be considered inebriated by marijuana. Just like many states have adopted the 0.08% BAC standard, a similar standard will need to be developed for marijuana before these devices can actually be effective.

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Do I Have to Live with a DWI for the Rest of My Life?

Having a “driving while intoxicated” charge on your record could seriously hinder future endeavors. It may be hard to get a good job, an apartment or even a loan. Thankfully, drivers in Missouri often have the opportunity to have this charge expunged from their record. This means it will not show up on background checks. There are certain requirements that must be met, however.

Missouri state law has a specific statute regarding DWI expungement. It falls under the same category as misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies. In order to have the charge expunged, it must be the driver’s first — and only — alcohol-related driving offense. Similarly, you cannot have any alcohol-related driving charges pending. Second, you must have been charged with a misdemeanor, not a felony. The charge must also be at least 10 years old in order to be considered.

If the expungement is granted, the driver essentially gets to start over record-wise. The state essentially eliminates the charge as if it never happened. In some states, drivers must legally answer “Yes” if an application asks if they have ever been charged with a DWI or DUI. But in Missouri, you can truthfully answer “No.”

For someone who made one unwise mistake in their younger driving years, Missouri’s expungement laws are a boon. For drivers who are currently facing a misdemeanor or criminal charges for driving while intoxicated, it may be beneficial to contact a criminal law attorney immediately. They may be able to fight the courts on your behalf.

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